LIBYA: THE DILEMMA OF VIOLENCE

In front of the military attacks on Libya perpetuated today by some European countries and the USA, the International Humanist Party expresses its total rejection of the use of violence and exhorts the International community to work urgently for a peaceful resolution of the civil war in this country.

Just as we previously rejected the violence that Gaddafi was using to repress his opponents and pointed out the contradictions, we now reject this supposed attempt to put an end to this violence using more violence.

We are aware that the situation in Libya represents a real dilemma and that it’s impossible to be indifferent when faced with the spillage of blood produced, because the social rebellion unfortunately could not be channelled and achieve a good end through peaceful means, as happened in Egypt. Violent repression by the Gaddafi government and the armed uprisings by a section of the rebels on the other hand fed a spiral of violence that is threatening to result in a massacre.

Faced with this complex situation, the UN has taken the decision to intervene—supposedly to guarantee the lives of civilians—and supposedly limited itself to aerial attacks to achieve this end. Nevertheless, we already have experience of how the UN usually expresses its concern for the rights of civilians and intervenes when there is oil at stake, as is the case of Libya. We have already seen how the USA and her allies sustain and tolerate bloody dictators when it is in their interests and then “discover” they are bloody dictators when they feel their interests are under threat.

France has been the first country to attack and Sarkozy put forward the argument that his motivation was to “put an end to the crazy murderer Gaddafi”. However, France as well as the United Kingdom and Italy have had very close links to the Gaddafi regime in recent years. Perhaps now more than ever they wish to secure access to Libyan oil, after events in Japan, and when popular opposition to the proliferation of nuclear reactors—from which France obtains a great proportion of her energy—is increasing.

During the World March for Peace and Nonviolence that went around the world at the end of 2009 we denounced the fact that neither the United Nations, nor even less its Security Council were able to guarantee world peace. Because the UN is run precisely by the powers who are the main producers of weapons, they are the ones who generate the greatest number of armed conflict, and they are the ones who, in order to ensure their economic interests, have no qualms about sustaining bloody dictators when it serves their purposes, and then bring them down in flames when this is no longer the case. And it is always the people who suffer the violence.

We will only be able to emerge from this dilemma of violence when, instead of depending on UN resolutions, the world is organised in a real Universal Human Nation. In the mean time, all possible efforts must be undertaken to resolve conflicts such as Libya through peaceful means, and remember the words of Silo in Punta de Vacas, Argentina in 2004: “… peace will not result from a violent approach to violence.”

International Coordination Team, 19/03/2011

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